Canadian grocery store sells fresh produce and honey from its own rooftop garden

A grocery store in Canada has taken the idea of a rooftop garden a giant step further.

The 25,000 square foot rooftop garden of IGA Extra Famille Duchemin grocery store produces around 35 different types of crops, which they later sell in the very same store.

Image credits: YouTube

Ever since 2017, the Montreal-based market is growing its own produce, including kale, lettuce, carrots, green beans, eggplant, garlic, tomatoes, and spinach. Moreover, the rooftop garden also includes beehives for honey. As UpWorthy reveals, IGA’s co-owner, Richard Duchemin, claims their strategy is quite successful.

Curiously, the fascinating garden is even designed in the shape of the grocery store’s logo.

Image credits: YouTube

In an interview with the Montreal Gazette, Mr. Duchemin said that he hoped his store’s rooftop would serve as an example for other grocery stores to follow.

“Why don’t supermarkets plant vegetables on their roofs? Some restaurants have little boxes where they grow herbs. We pushed it further because we know we’re able to sell what we produce here.”

What’s more, IGA’s rooftop garden is environmentally maintained, implementing awesome eco-friendly solutions.

For instance, the irrigation water comes from the store’s dehumidification system—water which would have been discarded anyway. Besides, the lush outdoor space serves as a wonderful habitat for bees and birds.

Image credits: YouTube

This innovative gardening approach could definitely promote local produce. Duchemin shared with the media:

“People are very interested in buying local. There’s nothing more local than this.”

Not only planting more rooftop gardens will promote buying local, but it can also reduce the environmental and economic costs of transporting produce.

In a viral Instagram post by Good News Movement, IGA’s co-founder was quoted saying:

“Not only does a green roof help regulate the temperature of the building below it, saving energy, but it also feeds into consumer demand for food with a smaller carbon footprint.”

Just think about it! Wouldn’t it be amazing if your groceries were freshly picked the very same day you’re buying them?

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